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Center for Bionanoscience Research (CIBION), National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET)
Physics Department, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, the University or Buenos Aires (UBA)

Center for Bionanoscience Research (CIBION), National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET)
Physics Department of the University or Buenos Aires (UBA)

We explore the properties and technological applications of nanoparticles, single molecules, nanostructured materials, supramolecular assemblies, biological and hybrid nanosystems.

Our tools are optical forces, luminescence, nanofabrication, fluorescence nanoscopy, plasmonics, nanophotonics, DNA origami, protein self-assembly .

The Applied nanoPhysics Group was launched in October 2009 at the Physics Department, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences,  of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA)

In 2012 we moved our labs to the Center for Bionanoscience Research (CIBION) of the National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET), while Prof. Stefani still holds his position at the Physics Department of the University of Buenos Aires.

CURRENT RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

Plasmonics and Nanophotonics.

Semiconductor-based devices are approaching intrinsic limits of speed and heat dissipation.
Optical devices are faster and practically loss-less, but their size miniaturization is limited by the wavelength of light. Nanophotonics and Plasmonics deals with the manipulation of light at the nanoscale. We investigate light-matter interaction between single-photon emitters and metallic nanoparticles to manipulate the rates and directionality of light absorption and emission.

Optical printing colloidal nanoparticles.

Colloidal chemistry enables the fabrication of nanoparticles of different shapes, sizes and material composition, that exhibit unique physical and chemical properties, inexistent in bulk materials. In order to make use of those properties in devices and circuits, it is necessary to develope methods to bring the colloidal nanoparticles from the liquid phase to specific locations of solid substrates. This is one of the open challenges of nanotechnology. We address it using optical forces. This in turn calls for a deeper understanding of thermo-osmosis and thermo-phoresis at the nanoscale.

Fluorescence nanoscopy.

Fluorescence nanoscopy methods, such as STORM and STED, have revolutionazed biological imaging because they provide a spatial resolution of 10 – 40 nm while keeping the low-invasiveness of far-field optical interrogation. We develop new methods, such as MINFLUX, and open-source software for fluorescence nanoscopy. In collaboration with colleagues of the life sciences, we apply fluorescence nanoscopy and single molecule methods to address questions of cellular biology.

Nanofabrication by self-assembly.

DNA origami technology makes use of the specific supramolecular assembly of DNA to construct nanostructures of practically arbitrary shapes. We have been applying this technology to fabricate hybrid nanostructures containing metallic nanoparticles and photo-active molecules in well defined geometries. Currently, we investigate a possible extension of this apprach using protein supra-molecular assembly.

LATESTS NEWS

Size-Selective Optical Printing of Silicon Nanoparticles through Their Dipolar Magnetic Resonance

In our recent work published in  ACS Photonics [pdf], we demonstrate that silicon nanoparticles of a predefined and narrow size range can be selectively immobilized on a substrate by optical printing from a polydisperse colloidal suspension. The size selectivity is based on differential optical forces that can be applied on nanoparticles [...]

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GROUP MEMBERS

DR. MARIANO BARELLA
DR. MARIANO BARELLAPostdoc
Nanoscale thermophoresis and thermo-osmosis
GERMÁN CHIARELLI
GERMÁN CHIARELLIUndergraduate.
Optical printing colloidal nanoparticles.
DR. LUCÍA LÓPEZ
DR. LUCÍA LÓPEZPostdoc
Fluorescence nanoscopy. MINFLUX
LUCIANA MARTÍNEZ
LUCIANA MARTÍNEZPhD candidate
Plasmon-assisted chemistry
LUCIANO MASULLO
LUCIANO MASULLOPhD candidate
Fluorescence nanoscopy.
MINFLUX.
DR. BRUNO SIARRY
DR. BRUNO SIARRYPostdoc
Image analysis for fluorescence nanoscopy.
SANTIAGO SOSA
SANTIAGO SOSAPhD candidate
Nanofabrication by protein self-assembly
DR. ALAN SZALAI
DR. ALAN SZALAIPostdoc
Visualization of neuronal structures with fluorescence nanoscopy
DR. IANINA L. VIOLI
DR. IANINA L. VIOLIPostdoc
Synthesis, modification and optical manipulation of colloidal nanoprticles
CECILIA ZAZA
CECILIA ZAZAPhD candidate
Optical printing colloidal nanoparticles and DNA origami structures
PROF. DR. FERNANDO D. STEFANI
PROF. DR. FERNANDO D. STEFANIPrincipal Investigator

COLLABORATORS

STEFAN HELL
Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (MPI-BPC, Göttingen, Germany)

PHILIP TINNEFELD
Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (LMU, Munich, Germany)

ALFREDO CÁCERES
Instituto de Investigación Médica Mercedes y Martín Ferreyra (Córdoba, Argentina)

STEFAN MAIER
Imperial College London (London, UK)

THOMAS JOVIN
Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (MPI-BPC, Göttingen, Germany)

ANDREA BRAGAS
University of Buenos Aires (UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

JOCHEN FELDMANN
Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (LMU, Munich, Germany)

NIEK VAN HULST
Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, Barcelona, Spain)

EDUARDO CORONADO
Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (UNC, Córdoba, Argentina)

PAVEL ZEMANEK
Czech Academy of Sciences (Brno, Czech Republic)

DAMIAN REFOJO
Biomedicine Research Institute of Buenos Aires (IBIOBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

RODRIGO PALACIOS
Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto (Córdoba, Argentina)

OSCAR CAMPETELLA
Universidad Nacional de General San Martín (UNSAM, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

OMAR AZZARONI
Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquímicas Teóricas y Aplicadas (La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

GUILLERMO ACUNA
Technical University of Braunschweig (Braunschweig, Germany)

MARINA SIMIAN
Universidad Nacional de General San Martín (UNSAM, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

SPONSORS

We highly appreciate the financial support by